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Japanese traditional clothes

Each country has its own traditions and culture, which can not affect the clothing of a particular nation. In Japan there is a traditional outfits for festivals, casual wear, various accessories that are not only extraordinarily beautiful, but have deep historical roots. Stay on the most famous Japanese clothing – kimono.

The kimono is a national dress of Japan in the form of a robe, which is fastened at the waist with a special belt, called Obi, and the sleeve has a width exceeding the thickness of the hands. Kimono has straps and twine, which are used instead of buttons. The length of such gown might vary, but usually reaches the ankles. Kimono is worn by both men and women. Dressed in kimono always on the right side. And the Obi is wrapped several times around the body and tie a bow.

The traditional dress has more than twelve elements that need to dress in a certain way. And for holidays and important events, are invited to attend even a special costume that should have nothing like a special license to perform this type of work.

Today, Japanese women abandoned complex multilayer garments, and began to wear kimono in one or two layers. Full set kimono dress for weddings or formal events.

Figure kimono

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